How to connect or tie Mecate Reins to Bosal

I have a lot of request on how to tie bosal reins and how to properly attach Mecate (me-ka-tee) (also improperly called McCarty) reins to a bosal. A quick refresher a bosal in the rawhide braided piece, the leather strap that holds the bosal on the horse is called a Hanger and the rope reins are called Mecate reins, all three combined are called a Hackamore. So knowing how to tie and un-tie this will enable you to wash your reins, clean and moisturize your bosal and still have confidence that you can re-tie your reins. I know so many people that never take their reins off since they don’t know how to put them back on. Hopefully this will make it pretty simple. The link up top will take you to my bosal page on my site where I have pictures and better explanations of the bosal and hackamore. I have also added a care and cleaning section to this page with links on where to buy rawhide cream used to clean and care for you bosal or other rawhide gear.

Originally posted 2012-02-14 07:11:23.

Tying the Fiador Knot for a Bosal Hackamore

I searched for a long time for a video like this so that I could tie the fiador for my bosal hackamore but I never could find one. Fortunately, my Dad knew how and showed me. I just thought I would share this video in case there are other people in the world like me that want to learn but are not fortunate enough to have someone to teach them.

Originally posted 2012-02-12 07:10:47.

Martin Black – The Hackamore

Great Basin horseman Martin Black delivers an insightful DVD series for the aspiring bridle horse maker and admirer alike. In these DVDs, Martin will share with you what he has learned from his experiences buckarooing on some big outfits and working around top-horseman using traditional gear and methods. Learn the function and use of this traditional gear, proper fitting and selection in the process of making of bridle horse. This is not the latest and greatest he is sharing, but rather an old tradition he wants to preserve and honor.

Originally posted 2012-02-12 07:10:20.

Martin Black – The Bridle

Great Basin horseman Martin Black delivers an insightful DVD series for the aspiring bridle horse maker and admirer alike. In these DVDs, Martin will share with you what he has learned from his experiences buckarooing on some big outfits and working around top-horseman using traditional gear and methods. Learn the function and use of this traditional gear, proper fitting and selection in the process of making of bridle horse. This is not the latest and greatest he is sharing, but rather an old tradition he wants to preserve and honor.

Originally posted 2012-02-11 07:09:50.

Horse Training with John Lyons – Pull Back Part 1

Learning how to tie a horse requires skill and safety. Most people assume it’s safe to tie their horses because they’ve never seen them pull back. Yet whenever a horse pulls back, it can have significant—possibly even deadly—consequences for the horse and anyone who might be nearby. In this two-part video clip, John Lyons—Americas Most Trusted Horseman—explains the principles behind why he teaches horses to give to pressure, then he demonstrates techniques. The main goal is to learn how to tie your horse safely.

Originally posted 2012-02-09 07:09:19.

The Head Shy Horse – Reasons For Head Shyness

The vast majority of times, a horse is head shy because of something a human has done. It’s a learned response to a painful experience. Being smacked on the face, having an ear twitched, being hit over the head with a rope, whip or other object. Even a rider with rough hands once the bridle is on can make a horse head shy if the horse has made the connection between letting the bridle on and being jerked about in the mouth.

But as with any evasive behavior on the part of a horse, it is best to first rule out any physical problems. Why else would a horse be head shy? Well it can be a symptom of a badly fitting bridle. If the bridle is too tight, it presses on their poll and hurts. A badly fitting bit can be to blame. Or one that tastes horrid. How are his teeth? Are they due for filing? Do they have any spikey or sharp edges? Or any decay or abscesses? Now onto the eyes. Poor vision can make a horse head shy. They jump because they can’t see properly and it startles them. Remember too that the horse has a blind spot right in front of him. Always approach him from the side, never directly in front.

Onto the ears. Bites from flies, lice, ticks or other parasites in or on the ear can be painful. Warts can be too. And then there’s ear infections. Check the ears over thoroughly, especially if your horse seems to be more ‘ear shy’ than ‘head shy’. It is helpful to know if your horse has ever had any of the above. Sometimes just the memory of the bite or infection, even when it has cleared up, will keep a horse head shy.

And last of all, if none of the above fit, a chiropractic adjustment could be the solution. If the neck is out behind the ears, your horse may have a raging headache and quite rightly won’t want to be touched.

Phil Tragear
http://www.HorseTrainingSuccess.com
Wake up the horse whisperer in you, because there’s one in all of us.

About the Author
Phil is author of the comprehensive book ‘Horse Training Success’, full of answers to the most asked horse training questions. Stop by http://www.horsetrainingsuccess.com for a huge selection of information regarding common problems, training of horses, equine psychology, how to get the best behavior and so much more!

 

Originally posted 2012-02-08 07:08:53.

How to Put on a Horse Bridle

Putting on a horse bridle requires standing near the shoulder of the animal, stroking the horse’s nose to get the head in the right position and gently inching the bridle on, making sure all straps are flat and comfortable. Get a horse used to wearing a bridle and bit with advice from a riding instructor in this video on equestrian living.

Originally posted 2012-02-06 07:07:53.