All posts by funhorse

Equine West Nile Questions

1. How do the horses become infected with West Nile virus?

The same way humans become infected-by the bite of infectious mosquitoes. The virus is located in the mosquito’s salivary glands. When mosquitoes bite or “feed” on the horse, the virus is injected into its blood system. The virus then multiplies and may cause illness. The mosquitoes become infected when they feed on infected birds or other animals.

2. How does the virus cause severe illness or death in horses?

Following transmission by an infected mosquito, the virus multiplies in the horse’s blood system, crosses the blood brain barrier, and infects the brain. The virus interferes with normal central nervous system functioning and causes inflammation of the brain.

3. I have a new horse with no vaccination history, how should I proceed?

If no history is known it is safest to assume previous vaccinations have NOT been given and give the two shot series of the Fort Dodge or one of the Vetera to establish protective titers. In some cases a simple phone call to the previous owner to establish past vaccination history can be helpful in creating a vaccination protocol for your new horse.

4. Can pregnant mares be vaccinated?

Yes, there is NO scientific evidence that West Nile vaccinations cause abortions or deformities.

5. What age should I begin vaccinating foals?

The American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) recommends that foals start the vaccination series for West Nile at 5 months.

6. My horse is vaccinated against eastern equine encephalitis (EEE), western equine encephalitis (WEE), and Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE). Will these vaccines protect my horse against West Nile virus infection?

No. EEE, WEE, and VEE belong to another family of viruses for which there is no cross-protection.

7. Is West Nile infection treatable?

There are several treatments aimed at minimizing symptoms and arresting progression. At this time there is no specific cure for the disease. While some horses make a complete recovery, others survivors may have long term deficits. Approximately 33% of horses that contract West Nile disease will die or be euthanized.

8. There is a horse in my barn diagnosed with West Nile, is my horse at greater risk?

The virus is not transmitted from horse to horse. Horses are known as “dead-end hosts”. This means that horses do not create enough virus particles for mosquitoes to transmit West Nile virus from an infected horse to a healthy horse. However the conditions in your area may be right for local birds to carry the disease. Your best protection is proper vaccinations and strict mosquitoe control measures.

Dr. Garfinkel is a graduate of the highly regarded College of Veterinary Medicine at North Carolina State University. She has been practicing in the East County of San Diego since 2000, and has built a reputation of providing high quality and compassionate care.

Visit her website at http://drgarfinkel.com and sign up for her free monthly newsletter.

Originally posted 2015-01-18 06:26:47.

The Life of a Racehorse – Before the Training Begins

colt-204195_1280The life of a racehorse begins long before it runs on any course. Before the horse steps foot on a course, is handed over to a racehorse trainer, or even born, owners and breeders carefully consider which sire and dam will make the best pairing to throw the ideal racehorse. These horses are bred in an attempt to pass on select qualities to their foals. Ideally, the offspring will naturally possess enough speed, stamina, and ability to make it successful, and these traits can be honed when the horse is old enough to be sent to a racehorse trainer and prepared to race.For most racehorses, life will begin in a breeding barn on a stud farm. Because all of these horses will be given an official birthday of January 1, breeders plan to have foals as close to January as possible so they will have more time to develop before beginning to race as two-year-olds. In the first few days of a new foal’s life, it will stick closely by its dam as it gains strength. The colt or filly will slowly become more independent. At first, foals need the mare’s milk, but eventually will begin to eat grass and then oats and grain. The filly or colt will be weaned from the mother when it is around six months of age, and is then known as a weanling.

For a while after weaning, the young horses are allowed to develop in paddocks. They are often turned out with other weanlings to grow and play. Weanlings become yearlings the first January after they are born. At this point, they are officially recognized to be a year old. While they are still a long way from beginning work under a racehorse trainer, the horses will soon be more directly affected by the racing industry. Many yearlings that have future careers running on the flat will be prepared to be sold at yearling auctions. Also, near the end of the year and just before their two-year-old birthdays, yearlings will be broken to the saddle. They will learn to accept tack and even the weight of a rider, and may possibly be introduced to a training track, though they will not be asked to work.

Once the yearlings have been introduced so some of the elements of the life of a racehorse, the best prospects will be sent to a racehorse trainer to join his or her stable of horses in training for races. Horses are eligible to race on the flat at two years of age, but jumps are reserved for three-year-olds and older horses.

By

If you have a passion for horseracing and would like to have further involvement then racehorse trainers can provide you with the vital next step, whether it be buying a racehorse or becoming part of a racehorse syndicate.

 

Originally posted 2015-01-06 06:08:29.

How To Get Your Horse To Finish His Stop

On the surface the principles of getting a horse to move and getting him to stop may appear directly opposed to each other. Both are immensely important in horse riding and training, depending on the situation, and both principles aid in teaching the other. In other words, getting a horse to go forward is critical in teaching him to stop and vice versa.

Firstly, what does it ‘really’ mean to stop? Stopping means: ‘Quit moving, drop dead, right here, right now, don’t go ’til I say, etc.’

As you can see, stopping is very black and white. Stopping isn’t slowing down. Stopping isn’t leaning to take a step once you’ve stopped. Stopping is not moving. Stopping is stopping. So it is essential that your horse understand what stopping means.

In order to teach your horse to stop, you must first examine your own behavior. In other words, when you’re on your horse and he’s moving a little too fast for you, what do you do? Do you say, ‘Whoa’ when you want him to slow down? If so what do you say when you want them to stop? So, do NOT say ‘whoa’ unless you want him to stop.

This habit causes confusion to the horse, remember they are creatures of habit and learn through repetition. They do not respond well to the same cue being for two or more different tasks. So change your habit because if you don’t, the horse will think ‘whoa’ means to slow down. The next thing to change is to ensure that you are very black and white in your instructions. When you say ‘whoa’ and you want him to stop, then he needs to stop – period! So here’s a tip to ensure that our horse learns this important skill. It order to get your horse to finish his stop and stop when you say ‘whoa’, get him to back up immediately on completing the stop.

Backing up immediately on completion of the stop assists the horse to learn that they are not going to be immediately moving forward. When you say ‘whoa’ they know that you going to ask them to take a step or two back. An added bonus of this technique is that it actually gets their backend under them, which has the effect of getting their front end lighter, which enables them to move left or right with greater ease, because it’s a more athletic position. It is important to remember that a horse stops well is the result of good habits on behalf of his rider, and effect and clear communication between rider and horse.

Read more: http://www.articlesbase.com/equestrian-articles/how-to-get-your-horse-to-finish-his-stop-2038508.html#ixzz0n6fIG5fk

King of the Wind: The Story of the Godolphin Arabian
Marguerite Henry Horse Books Set of 6 Volumes Including Misty of Chincoteague, Sea Star, Orphan of Chincoteague, Stormy, Misty's Foal, Misty's Twilight, Justin Morgan Had a Horse, and King of the Wind, the Story of the Godolphin Arabian
Arabian Horses (Ultimate)

Originally posted 2015-01-04 05:53:04.

Designing Your Horse’s Spring Training Program

takephotosBy

Levels of equine athletic training are becoming more acutely researched, more competitive, and more geared towards the longevity of the athlete’s career than ever before. To be ahead of the herd, a horse needs cross training and other varied forms of exercise to achieve the all-around competitive level required in most sports. The components of optimal fitness are cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility, and ideal weight.

In order to reach optimal levels of cardio-endurance, muscular strength, and flexibility at an ideal weight, workouts need to be calculated, and increased over time. This includes the frequency, intensity, and duration of every exercise. It sounds complicated, but can be easily monitored. By keeping track, you can carefully build on each component which adds gradual strength with less threat of injury. Listening to your horse, your instincts, and how you both feel has a lot to do with each workout. If your instincts tell you not to workout, don’t. If you remain conscientious, while sticking to your long term plan, missing a workout won’t affect the end result.

The Components

Cardiovascular Endurance is the ability of the heart and lungs to provide oxygen to exercising muscles for a prolonged period of time. This is achieved by long, slow rides, as well as fast, explosive sprints. This type of fitness is required for just about every sport, and should be started slowly to allow the connective tissue of the legs, and the cardio-respiratory system to adapt without stress. A strong foundation and a strong heart is what keeps a horse strong during competitive events. In events lasting several days, this strong foundation can be what separates the healthy winners from the injured drop outs.

In the event that you or your horse are not quite in the mood to do whatever exercise that you have scheduled for a specific day, a long, slow walk is always more beneficial than nothing. This will keep the foundation strong and help to prevent injury in the long run.

Muscular Strength is the maximum amount of force a muscle can overcome during one single contraction. This is achieved by a variety of modes. Up hill training is an excellent way to achieve strength in the limbs and specifically the core muscles of the back and abdominals. Muscular strength is required in just about every sport. Sprints, rollbacks, and resistance training can be incorporated into an effective strength training program. With increased strength adaptation on hills, explosive exercises can be added gradually.

Muscular Endurance is the number of repeated contractions a muscle can perform against a resistance without fatiguing. This is achieved by a combination of cardiovascular and explosive sprint work meant to take the levels of both strength and cardio-fitness to the highest levels. Through aerobic exercise and strength training, muscular endurance will occur naturally. This type of work is added after the foundation work has been done. The foundation work depends on your horse’s starting point, but a couple of weeks of long walks, three times a week is a good start before you start getting more aggressive.

Flexibility describes the range of motion of a joint. Increased flexibility is achieved through various static stretching (stretches held for 30 seconds) exercises done by the rider. Stretching the legs is heavy work for you to perform, but you’ll find that your horse will not only enjoy it, but will learn how to stretch himself out in the paddock. Research has recently shown that static stretching not only aids in flexibility, but has shown to add overall strength to the body.

Dynamic Flexibility is like stretching because it helps the horse to be more flexible, but this type of flexibility exercise is done through bending exercises under saddle. Serpentines, circles, figure 8’s, and various drills up and down the arena are a perfect example of a dynamic flexibility exercise.

There are a lot of factors that may inhibit flexibility. Sometimes the joint itself has lost mobility, sometimes the muscles have lost elasticity, and worst of all, sometimes fat gets in the way. I like to incorporate dynamic flexibility exercises into the cool down, and also during the rest periods in endurance work. Once the muscles are warm and full of blood, they can achieve great gains in flexibility. Instead of just walking your horse during the little breathers in sprint training, you can ask him to walk in circles to keep his rib cage open and flexible.

Sport Specific Training

Sport Specific Training is specifically performing the sport that you’ll be competing in. It is necessary for developing motor skills as they relate to your specific sport, but doesn’t include all of the components for a balanced fitness program. By performing the movements used in your sport, timing and balance are developed. This type of training should be focused during the horse’s schooling sessions which will be incorporated into the off days of the exercise schedule. Schooling and workouts are two different forms of training and should be practiced separately. Schooling is teaching the horse how to perform specific movements, and workouts are performed for the purpose of gaining strength and fitness. By taking an un-schooled horse into the arena and pushing him or her through a specific sport routine at the maximum levels will never teach him or her to be accurate in their specific sport.

A barrel horse needs to be strong and powerful, but if he isn’t schooled in how to turn a barrel properly and with precision, he’s not a great barrel horse. He should be taught how to do this separately from his workout.

He needs some added flexibility exercise in order to bend more effectively. If he’s too muscular, he’ll create excess heat within his body which may lead to early fatigue. A barrel horse needs a good cardio program so that his body efficiently delivers oxygen to the muscles and organs.

He needs a good strength program to accommodate the explosive forward movement and speed, and he needs the flexibility to be able to bend around the barrel tightly. Once that’s all done, he needs to cool down and be stretched out so that his muscles aren’t stiff and shortened for the next bout of competition.

This horse needs a program that’s divided up into segments over one week periods, then tied together to make up several months. One trick is to keep the horse from peaking too soon or losing too much weight, while balancing the workouts to include schooling, aerobics, strength, endurance, and flexibility. During this time, the horse’s chemical metabolism will be responding to each of your exercises which will affect how much water he should drink, what and how much he should eat, and how much massage and stretching is indicated.

Any animal, any breed, any age, any size, can be brought to their own level of optimum fitness if given reasonable goals. It will be your responsibility to set the goals, and follow through with gradual progression to safely achieve those goals. The overload should be designed so that the body can adapt to a slow progression of increased challenges without causing injury.

Mix It Up

Like humans, a horse’s program should include time on the track, the weight room, and whatever strategy that you can implement that includes flexibility training. Of course, you will need to improvise with hill work and explosive work instead of a weight room, but you will become creative as you witness your horse getting stronger.

This should be fun for you and your horse. Of course there are rules, and there are definitely some things that are forbidden, like stretching a cold muscle, but this time together is yours to enjoy, and you should remain open to substitutions and changes as circumstances change.

One of my favorite things to do is ride my horse in an arena with loud music blasting. I love to focus on patterns, and challenges. Fortunately for me, I’ve always had a horse that enjoys the same thing. Once my horse is strong, I (sort of) let him choose the plan for the day. In my own fitness programs, I’ve substituted a day of skiing or a long hike for an aerobic class. Why not? As long as you include all of the important components, and maintain the current intensity, your horse will appreciate the variety of trails, hills, and arena work.

Keeping an open mind as you go, you can change things according to weather, illness, injury, or whatever else comes up. Be sure to record the exercises as you normally would, and note when you made substitutions.

Avoiding boredom is one of the main challenges faced during a long term fitness program. Timing is another important factor. Each body part requires specific training strategies. The muscles, including the heart take up to 6 months to reach their peak, connective tissue (tendons and ligaments) take one to two years to develop their maximum strength, and bones take up to 3 years to fully develop. This is why it’s recommended that horses not begin intense physical exercise before the age of 4.

Be aware of the types of surfaces in which you are training, and choose grass or wood chips over dirt when possible. Deeper footing adds to intensity, so pay attention to how your horse feels, and make wise choices when possible.

Establish Your Starting Baseline

In order to measure improvements, you need to establish your starting position. You can then set your goals for the future. A veterinary consult is helpful at this point, and you should start recording everything.

Ask the vet about your horse’s weight, conformation, and movement as it relates to your fitness plan. The next step is to determine if there are any risk factors that require special attention. Some risk factors would be pregnancy, recent injury or surgery within the past 6 months, diet (how much, special requirements, required supplements), and special needs like shoes and tack.

Voice all of your concerns to the vet during this pre-program vet check. Tell the vet what your goals are. Ask him or her if your goals are realistic. Ask questions about your horse’s resting heart rate as opposed to what the vet might estimate the maximum heart rate to be.

If there are any questions about the horse’s tack or hooves, be sure to consult with a reputable professional before beginning the program. Having these items analyzed in advance can prevent some painful and expensive issues later in the program.

Keep Records

Height/Weight When you have the vet do the initial consultation, you will have them do the initial height and weight reading for recording. A height and weight tape can be purchased at most feed stores or catalogs for your follow up measurements.

Resting Heart Rate Take resting heart rate for 5 consecutive days the first thing in the morning to determine normal resting heart rate. Again, because of the nature of the beast, size, breed, and fitness level, there isn’t an exact average resting heart rate. Each horse will have its own normal. Be sure that you document this morning resting rate because later in the program, you will be monitoring the morning rate. An elevated heart rate in the morning can indicate over training, and this is something to watch closely.

Take Photos

You will be really happy to have your success recorded.

Put It Together

This is the fun part. Take the freedom to be creative with this. Start slowly, be sure to warm up properly, and then put it together according to what you and your horse choose. Once the foundation has been laid, you’re free to do as you choose. Here are some ideas;

For the first couple of weeks, lay the foundation with walking three times a week

Add one day of schooling. By this, I mean to take one day to slowly take your horse through his specific sport movements in a calculated and organized way at about 60% of his maximum.

You are now ready to add some strength work either by getting more aggressive and explosive in specific sports movements or by adding some hill work. Utilize the cool down time for dynamic flexibility like serpentines and figure 8’s.

After the under saddle cool down, while the horse is still somewhat warm, add some stretching to keep the horse flexible and not too bulky and stiff.

As time goes on, you can perform the sport specific exercises more and more aggressively to improve the horse’s endurance until you’re performing at 100% while still maintaining the precision that was taught during the schooling segments.

http://www.kathyduncan.blogspot.com, Kathy Duncan is the author of The Fit Horse Companion, a manual for horse health and fitness including massage therapy and hydrotherapy.

Equine Emergencies: Treatment and Procedures
Equine Fitness: A Program of Exercises and Routines for Your Horse
The Fit Horse Companion

Originally posted 2014-12-31 15:29:13.

How Do I Measure My Horse For A Rug?

As we head towards winter, it’s time to start thinking about your horse’s winter wardrobe. Do they need a new stable rug or turnout rug? Getting the right size and fit is essential to protect them fully and safely through the colder months. A rug that fits incorrectly can cause problems, like discomfort and chaffing if it’s too tight, or slipping and getting caught up in your horse’s legs if it is too big.

So if you’re in the market for a new horse rug, here are some tips on achieving a great fit. Your horse will thank you.

How do I measure my horse for a rug?

You have two options here:

  • If you already have a rug that’s a good fit for your horse, lay it flat and measure it from the middle of the chest at the top end down the length of the rug to the opposite end.
  • Or to measure your horse, use a soft tape measure starting at the centre of your horse’s chest measuring horizontally along to your horse’s rump where you would expect the rug to end.

Horse rugs are sized in feet and inches, going up a size in 3 inch increments. Select the size closest to your measurement. Generally it is best to go up rather than down to the nearest size if your horse is in between sizes. However, use your discretion here – if your horse is quite slight, it may be wise to go down slightly to the smaller size. Likewise, if your horse is very sturdy it might be an idea to go up a size.

Trying a horse rug on

After purchasing your rug you need to check you’ve got the right fit. When trying it on your horse for the first time leave the tags on and try it on over a thin summer sheet if possible. This will stop the rug getting hairy and will mean that you should be able to return it for an exchange or refund in immaculate condition if it doesn’t fit. To test out the size, check the fit around your horse’s chest, withers and shoulders by running your hands around and under the edge of the rug. The fit should be snug enough that it doesn’t slip back, but not so much that it restricts movement or rubs. Get a second opinion on the fit from an experienced horse owner if you’re not sure, you don’t want to end up with a costly mistake!

By   writes about Equestrian Products.

The Old Dairy Saddlery specialise in providing the best quality horse riding equipment at affordable prices. For a great range of horse rugs, visit the website.

Sgt. Reckless: America's War Horse
Manna Pro 0092954236 Apple Horse Treats, 5-Pound
Horsemen's Pride 10

Originally posted 2014-12-29 04:41:52.

Story Of Dun It For Money

Dun-It-For-Money-CCRI first laid eyes on Dun It For Money as a yearling where he was in a pen with other colts. Knowing he was too expensive for me, I purchased another colt who turned out to be a champion. I could not get him out of his mind. As a three year old, he was then sent to the NRHA Futurity where he placed in the finals.

The following Spring, Dun It For Money was shown at the Olympic Trials in Burbank. I sat in the stands with the owner as they watched a hot mad stallion stop and refuse to go any more. The rider threw his hands up in the air and rode out of the arena. The owner ran over and grabbed Dun It For Money from the trainer.

I did not see him again for 6 months and I still could not get him out of his mind. When Dun It For Money went up for sale, I sent for him. At the time that he arrived at my ranch, he was upset at the world and came out of the trailer on his hind legs rearing and striking. At that moment, I decided that Dun It For Money wasn’t ever going to leave my side. You see, we were both at a very similar stage in our lives and when we looked each other in the eye, there was a silent understanding.

With a month of horse trading and negotiating, I was able to purchase Dun It For Money. This was the most incredible moment in my life. I led him down to his arena and with eager anticipation I got on him. Dun It For Money promptly reached around and grabbed my leg with his mouth and took me to the ground. I pulled his head around, got him up, and got back on. Away we on our first trail ride together. I made him a promise that I would not ever work him or train him in an arena again because of Dun It For Money’s bad experiences. He blossomed very quickly and never once did he show any signs of quitting or getting mad!

The following summer I decided to enter him in the prestigious Santa Barbara Fiesta Rodeo and Stock Horse show him in Open Reining. We won it! I then entered him in the Monterey National Horse Show Open and again we took the championship title. I and Dun It For Money moved to Rosamond, CA where we occasionally showed at the local level. Not wanting to do reining with Dun It anymore, I just played around roping, team penning, and working cattle.

When Dun It For Money turned 15 years old, I decided to semi retire him to occasional trail rides only. Dun It For Money was not happy and grew over time to become mad and resentful over non use.

When the Extreme Cowboy Association “EXCA” Racing finals was just three days away, I decided to pull him out of his pen and try him on obstacles. To my surprise he loved it! In this first EXCA race, Dun It For Money had to jump, drag logs, and go over teeter bridges for the first time because I had not had a chance to introduce him to them. Dun It did not refuse one obstacle! We placed 4th in the Regional Championship with only 3 days preparation. Our first run video is the most posted and viewed globally and still is the favorite.

Three weeks later I took Dun It For Money to the Vaquero Days EXCA race in Desconso, CA where we won the Pro title. A few months later I took him to the EXCA World Championship where we made the finals and put on the first match race against Lee Hart. The Equine Affaire EXCA race was a couple months later where we placed 3rd against California’s toughest competition. Soon after we competed at the California Cowboy Racers EXCA event and we won it! This was his last race. Shortly afterwards, on May 24, 2011 at approximately 2:43 pm, Dun It For Money had a heart attack while breeding a mare and died in my arms. His legacy lives on through Dun It Colt 45, Laredo, La Cody Dun It, and Dun It Docavanna; all of which I own. On November 4, 2012, Dun It For Money was the first horse inducted into the EXCA Horse Hall of Fame.

I had always dreamed of the perfect horse, being a buckskin paint stud by Dun It For Money. I got my wish in March of 2008. I had been getting up every morning anticipating the new arrival. On the morning Laredo was born, I had Evon go check to see if he arrived. Evon came back to my room elated, “Chop, chop, get up and come see your dream horse”!

Laredo Dun It is the only buckskin paint stud by Dun It For Money. Laredo has his sire’s athletic ability, intelligence, and temperament. Laredo or Baby Bucky as we call him is now being trained for future shows and performances with an Extreme Cowboy Racing career in sight for 2015.

By Bill Cameron

Website: http://www.NaturalBornRiders.com

 

Originally posted 2014-11-29 04:44:16.

Lameness in Sport Horses

lamenessinsporthorsesLameness can present itself in a number of different ways and for different reasons;

– There is more that one area of pain
– The horses performance drops
– The horse shows behavioral changes

Sometimes assessment of the problem can be challenging if there is no clear reason for the change / drop in performance and associated lameness. Knowing the history of the horse can greatly assist in the diagnosis of the problem. The horses training schedule, length of time taken to reach levels of fitness and types of exercises will help to determine what types of strains and stresses muscles etc, have been put under.

When assessing the horse the main aims are to determine whether the problem relates to;

Pain

Weakness

–Young horses often show signs of weaknesses possibly relating to being tired. Training programs for youngsters should be relative to growth rate.

Neurological defects

Clinical Problems

— Poor shoeing can lead to bilateral foot pain, fetlock pain, hock pain, carpal pain, thoracic lumbar pain, sacroilliac pain, tying up.

— Good shoeing can assist horses with some minor problems stated above, when they perform.

Rider problems

— A poorly skilled rider can hinder horses when e.g. jumping – poor eye coming into a jump can cause a greater strain on horses’ muscles / ligaments / joints. This can cause tying up due to weaknesses from this.

Horse problems – sometimes the horse is just not skilled enough, suitable or has the right temperament for the discipline it is being ridden in.

Show Jumping and Dressage.

Subtle lameness may only slightly impede the horse’s performance and as many injuries tend to be repetitive, accumulating over time. Many trainers prefer to wait until the end of the season to investigate fully into the cause and future treatments. As the season ends and workloads reduce the demands on horses become less, the lameness seen at the height of competition season may be seen less, affecting the horse less.

Conformation has a clear impact on injury. Foot balance is essential for this discipline and despite a good farrier being able to shoe to accommodate for problems that may be evident. If a horse has an upright foot concussion related problems can occur more frequently.

When training Show Jumpers engagement and collection is required however this can accelerate problems in the thoracic lumbar region as it puts a lot more stress and strain on the area. Forelimbs will be constantly put under a lot of impact pressures, a good rider that stays stable and with a good center of balance will prevent the horse from having to cope with uneven weights as they regain position after a jump.

The experience and strength of the horse will, if not suitable for the job, hinder the horse, causing more stresses and strains as it jumps incorrectly due to tiredness and fatigue. The training surface needs to be considered carefully to help rather that slow down the training of the horse. Too hard and concussions can occur, too deep and suspensory injuries can occur. Joint, bone, foot bruising, inflammation of these areas and hoof wall problems are all common when horses are ridden on unsuitable surfaces.

When training Dressage horses training schedules are often dependent on the horse’s age. The dressage horse will spend a lot of time in the arena performing a lot of gymnastic exercises. Injuries and lameness are often tissue specific rather than concussive. The dressage horse needs to spend a lot of time working towards strengthening in order to not fatigue when performing difficult weight bearing movements. Desmitis in the hind limbs can occur due to the transfer of weight between front and hind limbs if the horse has not built up enough strength. Acute injuries are not often seen, instead, due to the repetitive nature of the training, it is these types of lamenesses that can occur. As the horse spends so long working in the arena, the surface is so important. Consistency and levelness across the entire surface must be maintained. It is worth considering that constant work on a soft surface as found in arena will not stimulate remodeling within the horses bones, important for strength. Training should incorporate work on hard ground occasionally to achieve this. Caution should be taken though not to shock the horse.

Published At: Isnare Free Articles Directory http://www.isnare.com
Permanent Link: http://www.isnare.com/?aid=391993&ca=Pets

Tammy is a avid equine rider who loves to promote the best ways to be looking after horses. Tammy works part time for anythingequine.co.uk who specialise in Horse Boots as well as equestrian rugs and Equetech equine in the UK.

Originally posted 2014-09-22 00:07:13.

Get That Horse Some Factor 50 and a Sunshade Please

sunshadeI was walking my dog early this morning to avoid the heat and I noticed a field of lovely horses of all different varieties, shapes and sizes, all clustered under one small tree. It was already getting warmer and on closer inspection , in fact I scoured the whole field. they were doing their best to stay cool because the water supply they had was totally inadequate.

Now taking aside the care of these particular horses , which I can assure you I will be dealing with. I wondered how many other well meaning owners were assuming their horses were ok in summer. People seem to assume horses will be fine in summer and only worry about them in winter, but horses overheat easily.

Dogs, cats, and even horses with sparse hair and light colored hair and skin are more likely to get sun related diseases. Sunburn is as painful in animals just as it is in people. It is recommended to keep your pet or horse out of the sun especially during the summer from 10 am to 4 pm. Horses can be protected in a barn and even a shade tree can really help. But the point is that they do need some protection from the sun.

Many cancers can affect the skin of animals and most come with too much sun exposure. Sunscreen can be used on animals but may be difficult to apply if they are hairy. Also, you must be careful the pet does not lick the sunscreen, as it could be bad for them. There are even sun suits available for your pet to prevent sun burn, although the pet may get hot in these or may chew them off. So there really is no substitute for providing them with the proper shade.

The single most important way to help horses in hot weather is to give them easy access to clean, fresh water. Like humans, horses control their temperature through sweating. But sweating leads to dehydration if the water and minerals aren’t replaced.

The safest solution is to install plenty of troughs and keep them full, as shallow water is sometimes hard to reach for smaller horses or ponies. Choosing self filling troughs is the easiest, option but can be expensive. Whatever the solution owners need to ensure the water is clean and thathorses are drinking it.

You can also turn horses out only in the evening, keeping them stabled in the day during summer, to minimize exposure to blazing sun and flies. But this only works if the stables are cool and well ventilated, otherwise they can quickly become far too hot. Keeping them in a really airless wooden stable isn’t the answer; they will just as easily fry in there. But brick or concrete stables are much cooler. All this calls for is a bit of common sense. If you would get hot closed in there then so will they.

The other thing I wanted to mention is that you may also be unaware that there is another potentially serious illness in horses that can easily be confused with straightforward sunburn, and that’s Photosensitization.

Photosensitization is a long word for what can be a serious skin condition. It looks like sunburned, crusty skin that can die and fall or rub, off. It is usually caused by a reaction to something the horse has eaten. Howeverthe skin problem doesn’t appear until the horse is exposed to sunlight. Three things can cause photosensitization. First, there can be a photo activating substance in the horse’s skin, second it can be caused by exposure to UV light, and thirdly it can be caused by lack of skin pigment, which enables more light to penetratethe skin.

Removing the horse from the sun will give them immediate relief. Exposure to the sun causes a chemical reaction in the skin which can be painful. Affected horses can be turned out at night and kept out of direct sunlight during the day. Depending on how bad the skin damage and loss is, it can a long time for them to get better.

Many horses with light skin can get sunburned. If your horse develops severe skin blisters and open wounds after exposure to the sun, it’s always wise to seek advice from your veterinarian to find out the cause.

Humans are constantly reminded by dermatologists about exposure to the sun and the risk of skin damage and cancer. Although you may not have ever considered it before, our pets can also be susceptible todiseases related to too much sun. So next time you see an animal that is not sufficiently protected, have a care, and even at the risk of some verbal abuse, let the owner know, as diplomatically as possible, that they could do better.

Source: Free Articles

About the Author

Roger Bourdon’s aim is to bring the joys of horseback riding to everyone with his books and website at http://anyhorsebackriding.com where you can get really cool free hints and tips on learning to horseback ride.

 

I was walking my dog early this morning to avoid the heat and I noticed a field of lovely horses of all different varieties, shapes and sizes, all clustered under one small tree. It was already getting warmer and on closer inspection , in fact I scoured the whole field. they were doing their best to stay cool because the water supply they had was totally inadequate.

Now taking aside the care of these particular horses , which I can assure you I will be dealing with. I wondered how many other well meaning owners were assuming their horses were ok in summer. People seem to assume horses will be fine in summer and only worry about them in winter, but horses overheat easily.

Dogs, cats, and even horses with sparse hair and light colored hair and skin are more likely to get sun related diseases. Sunburn is as painful in animals just as it is in people. It is recommended to keep your pet or horse out of the sun especially during the summer from 10 am to 4 pm. Horses can be protected in a barn and even a shade tree can really help. But the point is that they do need some protection from the sun.

Many cancers can affect the skin of animals and most come with too much sun exposure. Sunscreen can be used on animals but may be difficult to apply if they are hairy. Also, you must be careful the pet does not lick the sunscreen, as it could be bad for them. There are even sun suits available for your pet to prevent sun burn, although the pet may get hot in these or may chew them off. So there really is no substitute for providing them with the proper shade.

The single most important way to help horses in hot weather is to give them easy access to clean, fresh water. Like humans, horses control their temperature through sweating. But sweating leads to dehydration if the water and minerals aren’t replaced.

The safest solution is to install plenty of troughs and keep them full, as shallow water is sometimes hard to reach for smaller horses or ponies. Choosing self filling troughs is the easiest, option but can be expensive. Whatever the solution owners need to ensure the water is clean and thathorses are drinking it.

You can also turn horses out only in the evening, keeping them stabled in the day during summer, to minimize exposure to blazing sun and flies. But this only works if the stables are cool and well ventilated, otherwise they can quickly become far too hot. Keeping them in a really airless wooden stable isn’t the answer; they will just as easily fry in there. But brick or concrete stables are much cooler. All this calls for is a bit of common sense. If you would get hot closed in there then so will they.

The other thing I wanted to mention is that you may also be unaware that there is another potentially serious illness in horses that can easily be confused with straightforward sunburn, and that’s Photosensitization.

Photosensitization is a long word for what can be a serious skin condition. It looks like sunburned, crusty skin that can die and fall or rub, off. It is usually caused by a reaction to something the horse has eaten. Howeverthe skin problem doesn’t appear until the horse is exposed to sunlight. Three things can cause photosensitization. First, there can be a photo activating substance in the horse’s skin, second it can be caused by exposure to UV light, and thirdly it can be caused by lack of skin pigment, which enables more light to penetratethe skin.

Removing the horse from the sun will give them immediate relief. Exposure to the sun causes a chemical reaction in the skin which can be painful. Affected horses can be turned out at night and kept out of direct sunlight during the day. Depending on how bad the skin damage and loss is, it can a long time for them to get better.

Many horses with light skin can get sunburned. If your horse develops severe skin blisters and open wounds after exposure to the sun, it’s always wise to seek advice from your veterinarian to find out the cause.

Humans are constantly reminded by dermatologists about exposure to the sun and the risk of skin damage and cancer. Although you may not have ever considered it before, our pets can also be susceptible todiseases related to too much sun. So next time you see an animal that is not sufficiently protected, have a care, and even at the risk of some verbal abuse, let the owner know, as diplomatically as possible, that they could do better.

Source: Free Articles

Originally posted 2014-02-05 02:21:31.

Things You Must Know Before Buying Horse Saddles

saddlecomfortBy: John M

Horse riding is a phenomenal experience and the right type of horse tack equipment can add worth to it. Apart from choosing halter, stirrup, bridle, martingale and other products, you need to choose the horse saddles with great care. Since riding styles differ, there is a consistent demand for different types of saddles. It actually does not matter, whether you are a Western rider or an English rider, you just need to learn the most yielding tips to buy the equipments, to suit your style.

First, Learn Their Uses
For most of the horse-riders, pony saddles are nothing more than a necessary riding gear. Before you go out shopping, it is important for you to learn about the various advantages of these saddles, to make a perfect selection:
• Saddles are required to provide comfort while riding, the bony back horses.
• Relaxed riding posture is achieved by this saddle which also keeps your body aligned while riding.
• Horse saddles are significant in improving the performance of the horse.
• Especially for those choosing Western saddles, these equipments are like an extra support.

Take into Account the Comfort of Horse
Apart from evaluating the Western tack and English saddles for your comfort level, make sure you take into account the comfort level of your horse as well. Precisely measure the width and other dimensions of these equipments to give a perfect fit to your horse’s back. Make sure, it fits all the spots on the back of your horse. If you are a novice rider, take suggestions from an experienced rider.

Different Types of Saddles
• Available in different varieties, Western saddles are of many types, to offer different comfort levels. While ranch saddles offer a deep seat, roping saddles offer thick horn for secure fit. At the same time endurance saddles are lightweight and can withstand appreciable miles in a day.
1. English saddles have a light weight and are designed with simple looks. Hunt saddles and dressage saddles are two main types of products in this category.
• Apart from those mentioned above, third types of saddles are getting popular among horse riders. Known as Australian saddles, these products offers design along with the combination of features offered by the above two categories.

How About Used Saddles
While majority of horse riders opt for new pony saddles, there are others, who prefer to buy used horse gears. Make sure you examine the used horse tack equipment before spending money on it. To be on the safer side, you should opt for a brand new saddle and buy the best horse riding gear.
Your choice for a horse saddle can make a huge difference, especially when you are a novice horse rider. Make sure you shop right equipment, from the right place to cherish the rewarding horse riding experience.

About the Author

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/Things You Must Know Before Buying Horse Saddles

 

Stables: Beautiful Paddocks, Horse Barns, and Tack Rooms
Judy Richter's Riding for Kids: Stable Care, Equipment, Tack, Clothing, Longeing, Lessons, Jumping, Showing
Horseman's Guide to Tack and Equipment: Form, Fit And Function

Originally posted 2014-01-21 02:53:13.

Understanding the Importance and Popularity of the American Quarter Horse

cowgirl-419084_1280By: Phil Wiskell

Quarter Horse seems like a strange name for an animal, but only until you understand that Quarter horses are able to run a quarter mile faster than any other horse can run the same distance (in some situations, a Quarter Horse has been recorded at over 50 miles per hour while running at full speed), then its given name makes good sense. In part, that is a testament to the horse’s athletic ability, along with its strong, well-muscled hind legs.

Combine versatility and an even temper with those characteristics (athleticism and muscle structure) and you can see why Quarter Horses are some of the most popular choices among those who are buying from a list of horses for sale. Not only is the American Quarter Horse common with a lot of general buyers, but the breed is popular overall; the majority of horses registered worldwide are registered with the American Quarter Horse Association.

Of the registered Quarter Horses, many run races thanks to their speed. Many others are participants in horse shows. Others work on ranches around the world. Still others – thanks to the Quarter Horse’s compact body – are used in working with cows, calf roping, barrel racing, reining, cutting as well as other riding events. But don’t think of the Quarter Horse as merely a workhorse: the Quarter Horse is equally at home in other equestrian events.

Sport and speed both create environments in which the American Quarter Horse feels at home. With Thoroughbred, Arabian and Morgan bloodlines all contributing to the genetic pool of the American Quarter Horse, it’s not difficult to see why the Quarter Horse excels in most situations.

Because of this, the American Quarter Horse is often seen in show environments, in racing events, in rodeos as well as on the ranch, and even in stables that are home to horses that are owned by individuals and families, who just want a horse that they can take out for enjoyable rides on trails. It’s important to note, however that just because Quarter Horses are used for ranch working purposes as well as for trail riding doesn’t mean that they don’t serve other purposes as well; for example, many quarter horses have been used for dressage and for jumping competitions.

As with anything else in life, not all Quarter Horses are created equal. Most grow to between 14 and 16 hands high with some growing to 17 hands. Stock Quarter Horses are agile and muscled, however they appear to be compact and a bit stocky. Halter Quarter Horses, on the other hand tend to be taller and have similar smooth muscling to the Thoroughbred.

Regardless of whether or not the horses are of the stock or halter variety, you’re likely to discover that Quarter Horses are available in a wide variety of colors. Most commonly, you’ll find them listed as sorrel – a brownish-red, chestnut brown shade. That, however, doesn’t mean that you won’t find Quarter Horses listed that are described as black, bay, gray, dun, palomino, red roan or a number of other shades. All of these colors – along with spotted or pinto colors – are found to be acceptable when it comes time to register a horse with the American Quarter Horse Association, provided the horse’s parents were registered as well.

If you are looking for a family horse, lineage and registration with the American Quarter Horse Association may not be among your top priorities when you’re looking through listings of horses for sale. Instead, you may be focused on a child’s request for “a brown one,” or on finding a Quarter Horse that is closer to 14 hands rather than 16 or 17, which will make it easier for even the youngest members of your family to ride.

On the other hand, if you are looking for an American Quarter Horse because you are looking for the right animal to help you around the ranch, when it comes to reigning in cattle, you may actually want to know whether or not the Quarter Horse is from a working line.

In other words, when you’re making an effort to research Quarter Horses for any purpose, focus on your needs first and foremost. You will be more likely to find a Quarter Horse that will meet your expectations if you know what your expectations really are. This way you are sure to find exactly the Quarter Horse you need and want.

About the Author

Phil Wiskell is a writer for HorseClicks.com, popular classifieds of horses for sale, used trailers and ranches for sale.

(ArticlesBase SC #457411)

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/Understanding the Importance and Popularity of the American Quarter Horse

2015 American Quarter Horse Calendar
Legends: Outstanding Quarter Horse Stallions & Mares, Revised (A Western Horseman Book) (Volume 8)
Legends, Vol. 7: Outstanding Quarter Horse Stallions and Mares
The Quarter Horse

Originally posted 2013-12-15 03:06:07.